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Woman Suffrage Pickets at White House, 1917.  Photo by Harris & Ewing; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
When Women Won the Right to Vote: A History Unfinished
Join us for a virtual lecture and discussion of the legacies of the Nineteenth Amendment in the centennial year of its passage.

The passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 did not win women the right to vote—despite repeated claims that it did. Just what, then, did the woman suffrage amendment do? Historian Lisa Tetrault clarifies this history by positioning 1920 as the middle of a much larger story about the pursuit of voting rights, a struggle that is today unfinished and ongoing. Following the lecture, the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities will host a moderated Q&A session.

Dr. Lisa Tetrault is an associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University. She specializes in the history of gender, race, and American democracy with an emphasis on memory and social movements. She is the author of the prize-winning book The Myth of Seneca Falls: Memory and the Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1848-1898. A frequent commentator on the suffrage centennial, Tetrault also serves as an historical consultant for Nineteenth Amendment projects launched by the National Constitution Center, the Woodrow Wilson House, and Ancestry.com, as well as the documentary The Vote (PBS’s American Experience). The recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress, she is currently at work on a genealogy of the Nineteenth Amendment.

This lecture is presented as part of Who Gets to Vote, an initiative of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities intended to build public understanding of the complicated history of voting rights in America. Who Gets to Vote is made possible by the Federation of State Humanities Councils with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Image: Woman Suffrage Pickets at White House, 1917. Photo by Harris & Ewing; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Oct 23, 2020 11:00 AM in Central Time (US and Canada)

The Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing educational opportunities to all residents of the state.
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